Regular expression for validating email in java

In the first line, I am using Element By Id() to grab the phone number from the input element.Then I created my regular expression and attached it to a variable called phone RGEX notice that I did not need to wrap the regular expression in quotes this is because javascript natively recognizes regular expressions so there is no need to create them as strings then convert them.Here’s a fairly common code sample from Rails Applications with some sort of authentication system: If you’re experienced at Regex, this seems simple. Sections 3.2.4 and 3.4.1 of the RFC go into the requirements on how an email address needs to be formatted and, well, there’s not much you can’t do in your email address when quotes or backslashes are involved.If (like me when I first saw this) you AREN’T experienced at Regex, it takes a while to parse. The local string (the part of the email address that comes before the @) can contain any of these characters: is a valid email address. For this reason, for a time I began running any email address against the following regular expression instead: Simple, right? This is often the most I do and, when paired with a confirmation field for the email address on your registration form, can alleviate most problems with user error.Think about it this way: I register for your website under the email address . That’s probably going to bounce off of the illustrious mail daemon, but the formatting is fine; it’s a valid email address.To fix this problem, you implement an activation system where, after registering, I am sent an email with a link I must click.First go to your html file and paste the following code : Here, I have a simple form.It has an onsubmit event attached to a function called validate() that we are going to create later inside this form there are three inputs one for our phone number another one is for postal codes and the third and the last one is a submit button that is going to submit the form after we are done filling it. It contains only the code that validates the phone number.

It’s surprisingly easy, and you’re probably already doing it anyway. If you’re going to send an activation email to users, why bother using a gigantic regular expression?

They can get ridiculously convoluted as in the case above and, according to the specification, are often too strict anyway.

If you actually check the Google query I linked above, people have been writing (or trying to write) RFC-compliant regular expressions to parse email addresses for years.

Then I created a variable that contains the result of running the test() function on the phone Number string which will be a boolean that contain either true if the string matches our regular expression or false if it does not.

Now let’s jump into the fun part which is discussing the regular expression First we have the starting and ending slashes “/” , the expression then starts with a “^” sign to match with the beginning of the string.

Leave a Reply